Diane Arbus, née Nemerov (1923-1971) was a photographer and a granddaughter of furriers, the Nemerovs of Russek’s Fifth Avenue. Like Rubinson Fur Emporium, Russek’s Fifth Avenue boasted progeny of cultural significance—in Russek’s case, Diane Arbus and her brother, poet Howard Nemerov.

Rubinson Fur Emporium was often confused with Russek’s Fifth Avenue, another fur emporium also owned by Russian emigrés. Rubinson Fur Emporium became a major investor of the movie world, under the guidance of its peripatetic heiress, Virginie Brasi, until Virginie was disowned for betraying her forefathers by converting to Roman Catholicism. See Virginie Brasi

Chaya Sophia Chazanov Rubinson, also known as Madame Rubinson, began in the New York theater world as seamstress then set designer Cassandra Chase. She caught the eye of an investor in the 1933 Broadway flop, Mrs. Ida McKinley Gives Her Regards, a one-woman show. Synopsis: the epileptic widow of the fallen president gives a long and excruciating monologue while crocheting slippers as she talks her dead husband, who is in paradise. An avant-garde performance, it climaxed in an abrupt and completely unexpected seizure onstage, bringing down the house, literally, as people left the theater to avoid the “stark, vulgar display of rabid melancholy and unbearably extended, high-pitched, squealing sounds of mourning,” so the Times reproved. Despite rave reviews from a few discerning people in Brooklyn, the show shut down after twenty-four hours (to the relief of the ingenue actress, Sylvie Plato, who reported in an interview that “it was not just my vocal cords that were at stake, my fingers w...

Luca Brasi died in 1977. He died of exsanguination on an uncertain date in April: his body was found too late to determine the exact time of death. His obituary in the Catskills Reporter, clearly written by some anonymous childhood friend, privy to such minutiae (Peter Horn, is that you?), notes he graduated from Oberlin College, magna cum laude, with a major in comparative religion; his thesis, mainly speculative (he could have done more research, so said his advisors), was on Eastern mystic emblems in John Milton’s Paradise Lost. In his gap year, he traveled through France, Italy, Greece, and sneaked through what was then Yugoslavia, making friends mainly by mentioning names of soccer players, e.g., Ferenc Puskas, or Andrea di Stefano (though of the Real Madrid player, he was no fan). He loved the city of Trieste, where he made his first film, a stop-motion animation masterpiece clarifying a moment in Ulysses regarding the mysterious recurrence of ‘the lanky-looking galoot over there...

 

Gus, the famous polar bear of Central Park Zoo died in New York in 2013 after three decades of celebrity. He moved from Toledo, Ohio, to New York at the age of three and immediately after needed a therapist. He had two loves, Ida and Lily (also polar bears). At the death of Ida, zookeepers observed him swimming non-stop, going around in desolate figure eights, at one point for twelve hours straight. His therapist pronounced him “just bored and mildly crazy like a lot of people in New York.” A sympathetic businessman gifted Gus the polar bear with his own endless pool for his endless sadness. Even so, Gus the polar bear had to take Prozac. He became a symbol of the city. 

Please reload

THE END NOTES

ELVIS AARON PRESLEY

1/10
Please reload

Recent Posts

August 13, 2015

August 13, 2015

August 13, 2015

August 13, 2015

August 13, 2015

August 13, 2015

Please reload

Archive
Please reload

Search By Tags